[Orbit: Unity Mentorship] Q & A (September 28th, 7:00pm)

First time attending this event?  Please sign-up in our short form over here: goo.gl/JwpJzx

Ever wanted to make a 3D game cheaply on a low-to-medium end computer? Or a 2D game that utilizes the tools more commonly used in 3D engines, such as rigging? Unity may be just the game engine for you! Our TVGS Unity Orbit mentorship group can help provide you answers and resources to any questions you may have on this popular and free software.

We will have a questions and answers session where mentors can help answer any Unity problems you may have. Remember to bring your own project and questions!

The Unity Orbit group will meet on the 1st and 4th Thursday of the month at Tech Valley Game Space and will provide opportunities for participants to share information, discuss projects, ask questions and obtain guidance from experienced mentors.

About Orbit

Orbit is a community-driven mentorship program designed to provide greater opportunities for learning and collaboration at Tech Valley Game Space than ever before!

The goal of Orbit is to bring local game makers (and aspiring game makers!) together based around mutual interests, and provide a consistent environment for sustained skill development, personal growth, and community building.

RSVP at the links below!

rsvp-facebook rsvp-meetup

[Orbit: Unity Mentorship] Q & A (August 27th, 7:00pm)

First time attending this event?  Please sign-up in our short form over here: goo.gl/JwpJzx

Ever wanted to make a 3D game cheaply on a low-to-medium end computer? Or a 2D game that utilizes the tools more commonly used in 3D engines, such as rigging? Unity may be just the game engine for you! Our TVGS Unity Orbit mentorship group can help provide you answers and resources to any questions you may have on this popular and free software.

We will have a questions and answers session where mentors can help answer any Unity problems you may have. Remember to bring your own project and questions!

The Unity Orbit group will meet on the 1st and 4th Thursday of the month at Tech Valley Game Space and will provide opportunities for participants to share information, discuss projects, ask questions and obtain guidance from experienced mentors.

About Orbit

Orbit is a community-driven mentorship program designed to provide greater opportunities for learning and collaboration at Tech Valley Game Space than ever before!

The goal of Orbit is to bring local game makers (and aspiring game makers!) together based around mutual interests, and provide a consistent environment for sustained skill development, personal growth, and community building.

RSVP at the links below!

rsvp-facebook rsvp-meetup

Lesson Night: Beginner Game Creation (January 20, 2016)

Image by Kenney Studio

Are you interested in making your own games, but unsure about how to get started? Have you ever had an idea for a game, but assumed it would be too difficult and complex to create? If so, then this event is for you!

The goal of this free class is to provide an introduction to game making for anyone who is interested in trying it out. TVGS founder and game development veteran Jamey Stevenson will present an overview of what goes into making a game, including a look at various free and accessible resources that you can use to help bring your ideas to life.

This lesson is appropriate for participants of all ages and backgrounds. There is no prior experience required, and no need to feel daunted! Game development is incredibly fun and rewarding, and you’ll be amazed at what you can accomplish in a short span of time using the simple, intuitive tools covered in this class.

As usual, please RSVP in the Facebook event or Meetup below:

Lesson Night: Beginner Game Creation

Wednesday, Jan 20, 2016, 6:30 PM

Tech Valley Game Space
30 Third Street Troy, NY

0 Space Cadets Went

Image by Kenney StudioAre you interested in making your own games, but unsure about how to get started? Have you ever had an idea for a game, but assumed it would be too difficult and complex to create? If so, then this event is for you!The goal of this free class is to provide an introduction to game making for anyone who is interested in tryin…

Check out this Meetup →

Let’s Get Together and Make Games! (July 22, 2015)

Have a game project you’re working on, or even just an idea for a game you’d like to create? This is a great time to meet up with other people and tell them what your project is about, get some feedback from fellow game makers, and discuss how much progress has been made on your project. Game projects in any state of completion are welcome, so feel free to bring a laptop along and take advantage of the opportunity to improve your game while receiving help and guidance from experienced mentors.

Additionally, this meeting will include an update on our community activities, and a chance for interested members to discuss how much progress has been made on various TVGS initiatives and share ideas for what other types of events and workshops you’d like to see us host in the future.

For reference, you can view the current list of suggestions and group initiatives via the TVGS Trello board, located at http://tasks.techvalleygamespace.com.

As usual, please RSVP in the Facebook event or Meetup below:

Let’s Get Together and Make Games!

Wednesday, Jul 22, 2015, 6:00 PM

Tech Valley Game Space
291 River St, Suite 304 (3rd floor) Troy, NY

2 Space Cadets Attending

Have a game project you’re working on, or even just an idea for a game you’d like to create? This is a great time to meet up with other people and tell them what your project is about, get some feedback from fellow game makers, and discuss how much progress has been made on your project. Game projects in any state of completion are welcome, so feel…

Check out this Meetup →

Developing a Style

[Cross-posted from Omiya Games]

I’ve had a profound conversation while talking to a fledgling game developer this Game Developers Conference (GDC) that made me look back at my philosophy in game development. When Lindsay Grace was pointing out that one should have a long term objective such as Seemingly Pointless‘s goal in making a 100 games in one year, it made me reflect why I was developing one game every month. I’ve come to a conclusion that if one wants to make an impact to the gaming industry, one should strive to find and refine their own style that is both honest about oneself, and distinguishable from others.

Style, of course, comes in many forms. This can include mechanical styles, such as Vlambeer‘s simple-but-hyper-polished games, or Keita Takahashi‘s bizarre and chaotic experiences. Visual and narrative styles works great as well. As an example, Edmund McMillen has a distinct visual style that is often coupled with unnerving stories. Meanwhile, Molleindustria‘s political games helps them create experiences like no other. Even audio is a wonderful device to stylize. Who can possibly forget the first time they’ve successfully surpassed a series of obstacles in Bit.Trip Runner, creating a procedural generated music throughout the whole level? By having a clear style, each of these experiences become memorable and distinct from other common games.

So how does one go about developing their own style in games? Here’s a method I found that works: first figure out what your objectives are. For example, I wanted to contribute to the gaming community such that others would be motivated to make games that challenges common game genres like I was when I first played Katamari Damacy. Next, carefully analyze what you and your team are capable of. If your team hasn’t finished their game yet, this is a good time to attend game jams. In doing so, you’ll learn very quickly what you can and cannot do under a deadline. Once analyzed, find the overlap between your team’s objective and skill set. It’s worth noting that it is possible to have a non-overlapping goal and skill set. For example, making millions is an objective that is too broad to have overlap with any skill set. Similarly, making the next blockbuster is an objective so narrow, a large, expensive team is necessary to achieve it. In these cases, I recommend revising the objective so that it stands within your team’s skill set.

Finally, practice! I personally used #OneGameAMonth to polish my ability to create games with unique and solid game mechanics. Much of my time has been spent on understanding the mechanics I’ve created, and figure out how to enforce it with clever puzzles and situations. I also encourage others to make quick prototypes as regularly as possible. By developing your team’s skill set, and revising your own objectives to what works best with your team, you’ll slowly develop a successful style that feels like no other.